CP is a strong advocate for a scheduling system where all locomotive conductors and engineers would have scheduled time off and predictable work patterns. This would enhance predictability for all employees in road service who do not have assigned work and rest days.

FIVE ESSENTIAL FACTS ABOUT REST AND PREDICTABLE WORK TIME (2015 data)

Rest

REST AFTER EVERY RUN

Engineers and conductors can schedule 8-hours rest (+2 hour call) after every train run to the away-from-home terminal. When at their home location, they can schedule up to 24-hours rest (+2 hour call). At certain mileage periods, they can also schedule up to 48-hours rest (+2 hour call). Employees who work at home in yard operations typically work 8-hour shifts.

time-off

ADDITIONAL WAYS TO TAKE TIME OFF

35% of the time, road conductors and engineers do not, by choice, take all the rest time available after each shift at the home terminal. At the Away from home terminal people do not take the rest they are entitled to almost 50% of the time. However, there are many other ways to take time off, including earned days off, personal leave, and vacation. Typically, they have many hours or days between shifts.

12-Hour-Days

NO MORE THAN 12-HOUR DAYS

91% of the time road engineers and conductors are on duty between 0-10 hours. For anything over 10 hours, CP pays a monetary premium in accordance with the collective agreement provisions.

no-fixed-days

NO SCHEDULED DAYS

Road engineers and conductors do not have a scheduled shift length. By the 5-hour mark, they must inform the company if they are unwilling to work past 10 hours. This can make start times unpredictable for other employees when estimating when they will go to work.

Expect-the-Unexpected

EXPECTING THE UNEXPECTED

Anyone who has taken a commercial flight knows that weather happens. So do mechanical issues. The railway faces many of the same inevitabilities. Nevertheless, only 0.81% of runs exceeded 12 hours.